Architect crafts a new work studio from an old shipping container

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This zero-emissions flying water car lets you ditch traffic and sail to work

Ever been stuck in traffic and wished you had a floating car you could just drive off into the water? Then check this out: The Bubble is an electric water taxi that can get you out of rush hour and onto the water. The car, made by French company SeaBubbles, is silent, has zero emissions and creates no waves as it glides through the water.

SeaBubbles wants to change transportation by lowering emissions and making your commute quicker. According to the company, ditching roads and taking to the… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

New Passenger Drone can fly you to work hands-free with zero-emissions

Get ready to commute in style. For the past three years, Passenger Drone has been developing a zero-emissions, easy-to-use passenger drone that has the potential to eliminate stressful commutes. With 16 electric engines, the drone can travel up to 80 km/h without barely making a noise. Not only will the Passenger Drone reduce air and noise pollution, it will help reduce stress levels and improve the general health of commuters around the world.
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IStmyk3R3Hc

Daily… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

LAST CHANCE: Win a copy of TEEMING: How Superorganisms Work to Build Infinite Wealth in a Finite World

There is so much that we can learn from the natural world. ‘TEEMING: How Superorganisms Work to Build Infinite Wealth in a Finite World,’  by Dr. Woolley-Barker reveals all the ways in which animals societies can helps us thrive in the modern world. We talked to Dr. Woolley-Barker about her book, but if you want to get your hands on your very own copy, we are giving away 25 copies to a few lucky readers. Enter to win below: View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Three-fourths of sunscreens don’t work as they claim and may contain harmful chemicals

Before heading to the beach, most people make sure to pack a bottle of sunscreen. After all, the ultraviolet rays can be quite damaging and no one wants to develop skin cancer later on in life. While doing so is recommended, it turns out certain ingredients in hundreds of common sunscreens don’t work as well as advertised, according to a new report released by the Environmental Working Group (EWG). Additionally, 73 percent of 880 sunscreens that were tested contain “worrisome” ingredients people… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Al Gore reaches out to work with Donald Trump on climate change

Former Vice President Al Gore picked himself up after his controversial presidential election loss to George W. Bush in 2000 and became an internationally respected champion for the climate. But convincing President-elect Donald Trump of the urgent need to act on the climate crisis could be Gore’s greatest challenge yet. Many in the environmental community are in despair about the prospects of a Trump presidency. Trump has promised to withdrawal the US from the Paris climate agreement, scrap President… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

6 Beautiful and eco-friendly offices that make work seem like a dream

Those of you who work or have worked in an office are probably familiar with the lifeless 9-5 routine, stress and sedentarism, which are obviously very bad for anyone’s health and also, creativity. But architects all over the place are tackling the issue with View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

POLST and How They Work with Advance Directives

Image care of the POLST website
Image care of the POLST website

This blog post is the fourth in a series of guest posts by Arashi about end-of-life care planning and documentation in honor of National Healthcare Decisions Day.

POLST forms are another type of end of life planning tool. POLST stands for Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment. They’re also known as; medical orders on life-sustaining treatment (MOLST), medical orders on scope of treatment (MOST), or physician’s orders on scope of treatment (POST). The first POLST program was developed in Oregon in 1991 to create a standardized, easily recognizable, portable document which is designed to be transferable and actionable throughout the entire medical community.

POLST differs from advance directives in a number of ways. When one fills out an advanced directive, he or she is considering end-of-life choices regarding a myriad of future treatments. For example, if a person went into a persistent vegetative state with little to no hope of recovery would that person would want life sustaining technologies? An advance directive could be filled out at any time by any person independent of his/her current state of health. A POLST form is intended to be used by those who are seriously ill and are considering specific options regarding life support. A POLST form is started with a conversation between patient and physician. An advance directive should have a clear statement of general preferences while the POLST form is selecting from a set of choices. An advance directive generally requires some interpretation of preferences but a POLST form is intended to be an actionable order requiring no interpretation if or when the existent circumstances require it.

The POLST form was created to remedy some of the disadvantages of the advance directives. Advance directives do a good job of getting a general sense of what a person would want in end-of-life scenarios but often aren’t specific enough. They require a treating physician to translate intentions into orders. If the language of the advance directive is too ambiguous, the patient’s loved ones are still in the position of “deciding in the dark” what the patient really wanted. POLST forms also evolve with life sustaining technologies ensuring the patient is up-to-date on exactly what life support choices are being employed.

One advantage of advance directives is they can be done without the help of a lawyer or physician and they’re still able to be used to guide patient care. People can download an advance directive online and fill it out in a matter of hours. The disadvantage to this is the paperwork is with the patient when it should be shared with the medical professionals. POLST forms are available at doctors’ offices, completed with the help of a physician, and are created with the intent of going into the patient’s chart. They’re standardized and easily recognizable and designed to be transferable throughout different medical facilities.

POLST orders and advance directives are designed to work with each other. Advance directives should be considered general documentation of end-of-life care wishes while POLST orders are specific instances of physician’s orders. Everyone should have an advance directive written out—no matter how young or old or sick or healthy—they’re a “just in case” coverage of intentions. If a person is in a position where he or she has a prognosis of a year or less to live, having a POLST form is recommended.

POLST orders should be considered a second step to advance directives. POLST forms are a way to take one’s wishes from his or her advance directive and set them down in an unambiguous and concrete manner which is easily understood and applicable when needed. Research has shown the use of POLST forms results in higher levels of compliance from medical professionals. From physicians to EMTs to hospice care workers, most healthcare professionals find more accuracy of end-of-life preferences when the patient has a completed POLST order. And patients are more likely to receive the end-of-life treatments they desire when they have a POLST form.

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