Scientists made the coldest liquid water ever – and it’s crazy weird

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Water freezes at zero degrees Celsius or 32 degrees Fahrenheit, right? While that’s technically water’s freezing point, under certain conditions water can be supercooled, and a group of scientists recently measured the lowest liquid water temperature to date: -42.55 degrees Celsius. View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building



Scientists hypothesize why earthquakes happen where they shouldn’t

Scientists at the University of Kentucky and the University of Memphis may have learned why earthquakes often occur in places far from the boundary of any tectonic plate, where earthquakes are usually expected. The slow, steady grind of tectonic plates and the tension released by tectonic activity View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Scientists discover that exploding stars impact weather on Earth

Researchers at the Technical University of Denmark have learned that the cosmic rays emitted when stars explode have a measurable impact on weather patterns on Earth. Supernovae, which occur at the very end of a star’s life and result in a massive explosion, discharge ions, which affect cloud formation upon reaching Earth’s atmosphere. As cloud formation increases, weather on Earth becomes cooler. “Finally we have the last piece of the puzzle explaining how particles from space affect climate… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Macron offers 18 scientists the chance to “Make Our Planet Great Again”

France’s president Emmanuel Macron had an answer to President Donald Trump’s decision to tug America out of the Paris Agreement: invite scientists to research climate change solutions in France. The Make Our Planet Great Again initiative now has its first class: 18 scientists from around the world. They’ll move from institutions like Princeton University, Stanford University, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to France.

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Scientists warn of more severe earthquakes in 2018 as Earth’s rotation slows

You wouldn’t have felt it, but sometimes the Earth’s rotation slows down. Sure, the fluctuations are minute – maybe a millisecond here or there. But two geophysicists think there could be more destructive quakes next year because of the phenomenon – but it also could help us forecast the earthquakes.

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Via Science Magazine

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Chinese scientists created a type of rice that can grow in saltwater

For the first time, rice grown in diluted saltwater has yielded a crop sufficient enough to be commercially viable, according to a new study by Chinese scientists. The research team led by agricultural scientist Yuan Longping, also known as China’s “father of hybrid rice,” planted two hundred types of rice in spring in the coastal city of Qingdao in eastern China’s Shandong Province and then subsequently tested their resilience to saline-alkali soil and diluted saltwater; four types of rice showed… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Scientists locate half of the universe’s missing ordinary matter

Scientists have discovered the location of the universe’s missing matter, the other half of ordinary matter in the universe that could not be previously observed but which scientists knew to exist. Two independent teams of astronomers, one at the Institute of Space Astrophysics (IAS) in Orsay, France and the other from the University of Edinburgh, View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Scientists warn CO2 from warming soils could lead to uncontrollable temperature rise

There’s a lot scientists don’t know about how global warming could impact Earth’s natural systems. A 26-year-study of soil in Massachusetts’ Harvard Forest provides new insight. Researchers discovered warming soils are releasing more carbon than once thought, and could reach a tipping point, kicking off an unrelenting increase in warming temperatures.

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70-mile wide group of butterflies shows up on radar, confuses weather scientists

“It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s… a flock of migrating butterflies!” After spotting a colored mass flitting over Denver and nearby counties, weather scientists at the National Weather Service supposed the phenomenon was just a group of birds. With the help of social media users, however, they later realized that the group of loosely spaced insects with big wings was butterflies! It turns out, there are so many butterflies migrating across central U.S., they showed up on the radar.

https://twitter.com/NWSBoulder/status/915274142341042178

Weather… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Scientists warn new “super malaria” in SE Asia poses alarming global threat

If you’re planning a trip to South East Asia, you may want to reconsider your itinerary. An evolved form of malaria which is resistant to anti-malaria medication is spreading at an “alarming global rate,” according to scientists. The parasite was first documented in Cambodia but quickly migrated to other regions. Researchers predict mass casualties should the “super malaria” spread to Africa, where over 90 percent of cases occur.

The “super malaria” is more dangerous than the original… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building