Even scientists are shocked by the latest UN report on climate change

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According to a Monday report from the United Nations, reducing the Earth’s temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius is crucial if more extreme weather events and species’ extinction is to be avoided. The current ceiling on temperature increase is set at 2C since the 2015 Paris Agreement to which nearly 200 nations are committed. However, new UN research shows that this pledge is not enough to avoid possibly irreparable damage to our planet’s ecosystems.

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Scientists working to help manatees poisoned by Florida red tide

The massive bloom of the toxic algae known as red tide has been raising states of emergency within Florida counties over the past few months as a result of ecological and health related damages. The harmful algal blooms are causing extensive fish kills as well as sickness and death in sea turtles, birds, and marine mammals such as manatees. Red tide accounts for 10% of manatee deaths in the last decade, however due to the current bloom cycle that ratio may jump to a tremendous 30% in the near future…. View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Bees addicted to pesticides much like smokers to nicotine, scientists say

Bees have developed a likening to pesticide containing plants according to a recent study. The affinity exhibited by the bumblebees is similar to an addiction smokers face with nicotine found in cigarettes. Apparently, the more pesticide-laced pollen that the bees ingest, the more they crave the tainted alternatives. The contaminated nectar is potentially harmful to bees and unfortunately, researchers are finding higher quantities entering bee colonies than before.

Related: Canada moves to ban… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

SeagrassSpotter app empowers ocean lovers to become citizen scientists

Bet you don’t often think about seagrass, but this powerhouse plant supports thousands of marine creatures, sequesters carbon, cleans water, and generates oxygen. But Earth loses around two football pitches of seagrass every single hour, according to Wales-based charity Project Seagrass, and co-founder Richard Unsworth told Mongabay irregular mapping of seagrass meadows has hindered work to protect the plants. So Project Seagrass released their SeagrassSpotter app, with the hope that instead of a… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

6 ways that scientists are hacking the planet

Our planet Earth is struggling through an historically challenging era, thanks in no small part to the actions of our species. Some scientists have proposed labeling this period as the Anthropocene epoch due to the outsized influence that humans have had on the planet’s ecosystems, especially in the past several centuries. Climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions produced by human-created machines View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Scientists at the San Diego Zoo find some hope for saving the nearly-extinct northern white rhino

Only two northern white rhinos remain on Earth — two females, Najin and Fatu. But scientists have hatched a scheme to save the subspecies, and recently published a new study revealing preserved cells could hold enough genetic diversity to seed a viable population.

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Scientists just created a new “super wood” that’s stronger than steel

Spider silk has long held the record for the strongest known natural biomaterial on Earth – but that just changed. Scientists at KTH Royal Institute of Technology created a new biomaterial using wood nanofibers that is stronger even than spider silk. Researchers “densified” wood to turn an already sturdy material into a “super wood” that is as strong as steel.

To accomplish this, researchers used tiny cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) in a process that forces the fibers to align in the same… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Scientists pledge to sequence the DNA of all 1.5 million known species on Earth

An international group of researchers is organizing a massive effort to sequence the DNA of every single one of the 1.5 million species on Earth. The Earth BioGenome project is the largest genome sequencing project ever, and will help scientists understand and protect the plants, animals and fungi that call our planet home.

Researchers announced their ambitious plans this week at the World Economic Forum. “Increasing our understanding of Earth’s biodiversity and responsibly stewarding… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Scientists accidentally create mutant enzyme that chomps plastic for lunch

At a trash dump in 2016, Japanese researchers discovered the first known bacterium that had evolved to consume plastic. An international team of researchers, building on that finding, revealed the structure of the enzyme the microorganism produces — and then engineered it to be even better.

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Scientists discover a huge new human organ hiding in plain sight

Researchers have revealed their unusual discovery of a new human organ, the interstitium, which consists of a series of fluid-filled, shock-absorbing compartments that shield body tissues. The interstitium was previously thought to be dense layers of connective tissue. However, Dr. David Carr-Locke and Dr. Petros Benias identified it as an organ while scanning a patient’s bile duct for signs of cancer. The doctors collaborated with New York University pathologist Dr. Neil Theise to further explore… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building