Heat stress from climate change may cost global economies $2 trillion by 2030

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Research reveals yet another loss we can anticipate at the hands of climate change: global productivity. Heat stress in lower income countries has already shortened work days, which could result in a net loss of $2 trillion across all global economies by the year 2030. The sad irony is that the countries contributing the least to global warming will end up hurting the most.

A recent study published in Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health is one of six detailing the economic devastation… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building



A beautiful perforated facade shields this office from Indias harsh sun

https://vimeo.com/173213987

The Punjab Kesari Headquarters is currently under construction, however, the International Property Awards has already designated the design as Winner Best Office Architecture India 2016-7. Set on the corner of an intersection, the 18,000-square-meter office space was created with the objective of reducing heat gain and maximizing natural light to the point that no artificial lighting would be needed on the typical day. Its white, glass-reinforced concrete facade, which… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

BigDelta machine 3D-prints durable, affordable houses from dirt

Think you’ve seen it all with 3D-printing? Think again. Italian company WASP (World’s Advanced Saving Project) is working on durable, affordable 3D-printed homes made from dirt and mud. View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

New bike “greenway” stretching from Florida to Maine is 31% complete

If you live along the East Coast of the United States, you may have noticed roadside signs that designate a particular stretch of road or path as part of the East Coast Greenway. This mega-project aims to create a cohesive, safe bike route that traverses nearly the entire East Coast. Since 1991, the East Coast Greenway has pieced together existing infrastructure and helped to develop new paths in pursuit of this goal. As of 2016, 850 miles of trail have been established, though the project is still… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Uranium extracted from the oceans could power cities for thousands of years

There are over four billion tons of uranium in the ocean, and if scientists can figure out a way to extract the uranium, it could provide power for the world for “10,000 years.” That uranium would provide power for nuclear plants, and scientists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have come closer to successfully extracting the material with the development of special absorbent fibers. View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

How to protect your family from mosquitoes without using harsh chemicals

Protecting Your Family From Mosquitoes Without Using Harsh Chemicals

Summer is coming, and with it comes barbeques and other outdoor activities that we can enjoy in the warm weather. Unfortunately, the warming weather also brings mosquitoes and the diseases that they carry. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), mosquitoes are the most prevalent carrier of insect borne diseases, carrying things like dengue fever, malaria, yellow fever and the Zika virus. These diseases are responsible… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Darling Tinycamper from Lithuania starts at just 7K

In the world of backpacking, minimalism is a hot topic because a hiker has to carry everything on their back. When it comes to traveling with a trailer—whether you call it “caravaning” or “RVing” or simply “camping”—minimalism also comes into play, but it usually doesn’t look quite like this. Tinycamper, a private company based in Lithuania, is making modern teardrop-style campers that provide shelter during quick weekend getaways for those who love the outdoors, but just aren’t… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Bosnian retiree handcrafts a stunning VW exterior from over 50,000 pieces of oak

Bojic, a resident of Celinac near Banja Luka, Bosnia, describes his timber car as a “labor of love.” He started with the bodywork of a regular Beetle and then covered it with timber tiling and custom wooden fittings, from a steering wheel to hubcaps, all of which were handmade in his garden workshop.

Related: Toyota’s gorgeous Setsuna car is made from 86 handcrafted wooden panels

All parts of the bespoke cruiser are fully functional. To top it all off, Bojic wears a custom hat covered… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Absolutely enchanting AirBNB home in Brazil was built from demolished houses in the area

The Floripa cabin is located on the north of the island, overlooking rough but crystal clear waters and a fine white sand beach. Jaime settled in the island 30 years ago, where he decided to base his visual arts studio, and later on, built his recycled View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

A Report from Maine Death with Dignity Bill Hearing

This is a report from last Friday’s Maine House Committee Hearing on LD1270 – An Act Regarding Patient Self-Directed Care at End-of-Life by our long-time supporter, Valerie Lovelace.

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Val is the executive director of the nonprofit It’s My Death, which she founded to honor a promise to her sister Dee, dying of cancer, “to teach others how to be with dying, how to speak and listen to one another the way we had learned to speak and listen, and how to go on even when afraid.” She is an inter-faith minister, ordained by calling, studying and practicing in the traditions of her elders and teachers, who are Native American, Christian, and Buddhist. She is a hospice volunteer, artist, and the parent of three adult children. She is also a homeopathic practitioner and a Reiki Master, retired from the U.S. Navy, and a trained EMT. She lives in Maine.

Maine’s Motto is “Dirigo” or “I Direct” or “I Lead” and its tagline “The Way Life Should Be.” I’m proud of how hard my legislators work to ensure our laws are fair, straight forward, and seek to ensure as much freedom as possible. It’s a balancing act, for sure. What I love about the process is that at the end of the day, when a piece of legislation is enacted, it’s been hammered over to produce the best and safest possible piece of legislation.

Attending the First Hearing for LD1270

Maine’s LD1270, An Act Regarding Patient Self-Directed Care at End-of-Life, enjoyed its first public hearing on Friday, May 15, 2015, in Augusta before the Joint Standing Committee for Health and Human Services. The bill, sponsored by Senator Roger Katz and co-sponsored by nine others, is closely modeled on Vermont’s Act 39, Patient Choice and Control at End of Life.

I was excited to go to the hearing for a number of reasons.

  • Foremost, I am committed to the needs of dying people and believe our dying is the most intimate event we will ever experience – our final act of living. As such, I hold it sacred to the individual.
  • Secondly, it was my first time to the State House and first time being an actual participant in the legislative process as a concerned citizen.
  • Finally, the bonus for me is that it was my birthday.

Legal, Professional, and Emotional Testimonies

It was a rare gift, indeed, to hear testimony after testimony regarding the need for a safe, legal end-of-life prescription process in Maine. Senator Katz spoke eloquently about the bill and what it offers, what it safeguards, and how it addresses concerns generally voiced in opposition. He was followed by a number of co-sponsors who also testified, some with profoundly personal stories of loss. Following that testimony, citizens had three minutes each to speak for, against, or neither-for-or-against the bill.

Supporters came forward with both professional and deeply moving personal stories, demonstrating a clear understanding of the bill. Voices in support, voices in opposition, voices offering neither for-or-against critiques: all heard, all noted, and all to be taken into working session.

I spoke briefly and submitted written testimony. My feeling is that the personal stories and experiences of all who came to support LD1270 sent a clear, unified message to our legislators: “Dirigo.” The way life (and the end of life) should be: self-directed.

Next Steps for Maine’s Death with Dignity Bill

I’m awestruck by the enormity of the task that lay ahead for this committee, who will enter working session for the bill on May 22, 2015. They will read mountains of testimony, research key points they want to understand better, dig into the legislative workings of the bill, challenge whether safeguards are reasonable, whether choice is reasonable, and whether, in the grand scheme of our living and dying, it makes good sense to embrace this end-of-life option for Maine.

I trust the process. Each of these legislators, I believe, will do their best to comprehend the bill, learn about end-of-life prescriptions and how LD1270 proposes to make that a safe process for competent, terminally ill adults who want to choose an end-of-life prescription to use as their death becomes more imminent.

We here in Maine took a good first step.

View full post on Death with Dignity National Center