You can relax: A man in China did not just discover the world’s largest mosquito

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If you think getting bit by your average mosquito is irritating, imagine being stabbed by one with a wingspan longer than your hands. Insect expert Zhao Li claims to have caught the world’s biggest mosquito, with a four and a half inch wingspan – 10 times longer than your average backyard sucker.

Zhoa Li is famous for discovering the longest insect in the world – a two foot long megastick insect found in China. Now he is breaking records again. Li identified the world’s largest mosquito in… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building



Scientists discover a huge new human organ hiding in plain sight

Researchers have revealed their unusual discovery of a new human organ, the interstitium, which consists of a series of fluid-filled, shock-absorbing compartments that shield body tissues. The interstitium was previously thought to be dense layers of connective tissue. However, Dr. David Carr-Locke and Dr. Petros Benias identified it as an organ while scanning a patient’s bile duct for signs of cancer. The doctors collaborated with New York University pathologist Dr. Neil Theise to further explore… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Geologists discover bacteria that turns small bits of gold into solid nuggets

Geologists in Queensland, Australia have discovered a unique type of bacteria that is able to forge small bits of gold into solid nuggets. This discovery could allow mining companies to reprocess previously undesirable gold into market-ready products as well as transform the ways in which gold-containing electronics are disposed. “In electronic waste, there’s a lot of gold,” University of Adelaide associate professor Frank Reith told ABC. ”We need a technique without impact to health or community… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Scientists discover that exploding stars impact weather on Earth

Researchers at the Technical University of Denmark have learned that the cosmic rays emitted when stars explode have a measurable impact on weather patterns on Earth. Supernovae, which occur at the very end of a star’s life and result in a massive explosion, discharge ions, which affect cloud formation upon reaching Earth’s atmosphere. As cloud formation increases, weather on Earth becomes cooler. “Finally we have the last piece of the puzzle explaining how particles from space affect climate… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Egyptians discover three 1,000-year-old sunken ships full of treasure

On Tuesday, Egyptian officials revealed that archaeologists had located three sunken ships off the country’s northern coast in Alexandria’s Abu Qir Bay. The wrecks, determined to be of Roman origin, were discovered filled with ancient artifacts dating back at least 1000 years. Included in the bounty excavated were gold coins issued during the reign of Rome’s first emperor, Augustus, also known as Augustus Caesar Octavian (Julius Caesar was his great-uncle), as well as pottery, and a “royal head… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Geologists discover fossils from 13 ancient tree species in Antarctica

It may be hard to believe, but forests once sprawled across Antarctica. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee geologists recently climbed the slopes of McIntyre Promontory in the Transantarctic Mountains to uncover fossil fragments from 13 trees that greened Antarctica more than 260 million years ago – before the first dinosaurs ever walked the planet.

Related: View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Undergrad student leads scientists to discover nearly 100 unknown volcanoes – in Antarctica

There’s a new contender for Earth’s biggest volcanic region: Antarctica. Researchers found 91 volcanoes previously unknown to humans, and the volcanoes are massive, ranging in height from around 328 to 12,631 feet. They were tipped off to the cluster of volcanoes thanks to a third-year undergraduate student at the University of Edinburgh.

Third-year student Max Van Wyk de Vries analyzed radar mapping data of the continent, and proposed a study to the university. Scientists were then able… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Scientists discover Antarctica is covered in rivers

 

For decades, scientists have known that summertime brings liquid meltwater to Antarctica’s ice sheets. But until now, they’ve had no idea just how extensive the continent’s network of rivers, streams, ponds, and waterfalls really is. A new analysis by scientists at  Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory has found that warmer months cause far more extensive melting than previously thought.

 

That could be a problem as global temperatures continue… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Scientists discover immense pool of molten carbon beneath the Western United States

In what could be some of the worst news for climate change since the election of Donald Trump, a group of scientists have discovered a massive reservoir of melting carbon hidden deep under the western United States. Previously undiscovered, the researchers used the world’s largest array of seismic sensors to map the reservoir, with covers an area of about 695,000 square miles and challenges everything scientists have previously thought about the amounts of carbon trapped inside the Earth. To make… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Researchers discover evidence of supernovae on the sea floor

After a long and dedicated search, scientists believe they have discovered trace elements from supernovae settled on the sea floor. Iron isotopes created from a supernova explosion 2.2 million years ago have found their way into fossilized bacteria taken from a sample of the sea bed floor, the only place they would still be found after all this time.

Astrophysicist Shawn Bishop from the Technical University of Munich, Germany, published a new paper in the Proceedings of the National… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building