A recycled brick wall runs through this breezy home in Australia

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Bright, breezy and surrounded by nature, the Cedar Lane House is a place of peaceful respite on the south coast of Australia. Sydney-based architect and photographer Edward Birch designed the light-filled residence at the base of a mountain in Meroo Meadow. Spread out across 280 square meters, the linear home is anchored by a recycled brick wall that runs the length of the building and imbues the interior with warmth and softness.

The Cedar Lane House is organized into three pavilion-like… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building



The 1970s brick Upside-Down House gets an eco-friendly refresh

Melbourne-based Inbetween Architecture has breathed new life into a dark and tired 1970s double brick home in Kew, Australia. Nicknamed the Upside-Down House, the gut-renovation includes a dramatically transformed interior in addition to a focus on natural daylight and energy efficiency. In addition to increased daylighting with skylights and adherence to passive solar principles, the remodeled home was fitted with energy-saving LEDs, hydronic heating, improved insulation, and solar-powered ventilators…. View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Lego-like kindergarten sparks creativity with a playful brick facade

Brick may often be seen as boring and traditional, but that’s not the case when the material falls into the hands of KIENTRUC O. The Vietnamese architecture studio creatively used the ancient building block to breathe life and openness into Ho Chi Minh City’s new Chuon Chuon Kim 2 Kindergarten. Located in the city’s District 2, the building is built entirely of bare brick forming patterns and openings in an eye-catching and playful facade that promotes natural ventilation.

Likened… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

This stunning brick “cave house” in Vietnam is open to the elements

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Philip Johnson’s secret brick and glass home in Manhattan, NYC

From the outside of Philip Johnson’s sole private residence in Manhattan, you’d never guess a modernist paradise lay within. An unassuming brick and glass facade sits snugly between two apartment buildings, but inside is a secret glass house that was the architect’s only New York City residential commission. The Rockefeller Guest House was built near the beginning of Johnson’s career, between 1949 and 1950.

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