Iceland is replanting its forests 1,000 years after vikings razed them

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Iceland has become a popular tourist destination due in no small part to its breathtaking views and unique geological features. Though beautiful, Iceland is largely barren of trees. When settlers first arrived in Iceland in the ninth century, up to 40 percent of the land area was covered with forests. The Vikings cleared these trees for fuel and to make space for grazing. Erosion from overgrazing and disruption from volcanic events left Iceland nearly without woods. Now, in collaboration with forest… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building



This revolutionary sustainable community in Atlanta is still thriving 15 years after its founding

I have a project that includes a sustainable community design and a net-zero house within it. I designed the masterplan for Serenbe Community located outside of Atlanta. The design began in 2001, the first house was built in 2004, and now there are 600 residents. The second image shows an aerial of one of four hamlets planned for the community in what we are calling a constellation of sustainable hamlets. The second image is of my house, just completed within the community with passive solar, PV… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Soldiers reportedly kill forest defenders in Cambodia after they challenged illegal loggers

Government forces reportedly attacked a forest protection ranger, conservation worker, and military police officer in a part of northeastern Cambodia that grapples with illegal logging, per the Associated Press. The soldiers killed the forest defenders in what seemed to be retaliation after the three-person team seized equipment from illegal loggers, according to officials. Senior environmental official Keo Sopheak said, “The three were killed not by robbers or a guerrilla group but they were shot… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Canadian TV host facing backlash after bragging about killing a cougar

A Canadian TV host is being met with outrage after bragging about killing a cougar. The Edge host Steve Ecklund shot the cougar in Northern Alberta and posted photos of it on his Facebook page earlier this month. Later, he posted photos of cooking the cougar’s meat. Now, people are calling Ecklund out on social media as he defends his decision.

https://www.facebook.com/steve.ecklund.1/posts/1586156528127389?pnref=story

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via CBCNews View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Critical climate record satellite program at risk after Congress slashes funding

Scientists all over Earth depend on sea ice data from United States military satellites. But one of those satellites recently broke down – and only three ageing ones remain. Even worse, earlier this year the United States Congress said a backup probe had to be dismantled because they didn’t want to pay to keep it in storage. Nearly 40 years of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice satellite measurements could soon be disrupted. View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

American women and their dogs rescued after surviving five months at sea in shark-infested waters

Two women from Honolulu, Hawaii, are basking in the sweet relief of being rescued after they and their dogs spent five months stranded at sea in shark-infested waters. Jennifer Appel and Tasha Fuiava set a course for Tahiti on May 3rd but shortly after, suffered engine failure and a broken mast when a storm battered their boat. Fortunately, they had water purifiers, a year’s worth of dog food, and rice, pasta, and oatmeal. The basic supplies kept them alive long enough to be spotted by a Taiwanese… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Florida residents prohibited from using solar energy after Hurricane Irma

Millions of Florida residents lost power after Hurricane Irma. But homeowners with solar energy installations couldn’t use them – or they’d be breaking the law. Florida’s electricity board made it illegal for people to power their houses with solar panels.

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Wild tigers are returning to Kazakhstan after 70-year absence

70 years after the majestic big cat went extinct in the country, wild tigers are being reintroduced to Kazakhstan. If this project proves successful, it would stand as the first instance in which wild tigers have been revitalized in a region from which they had gone extinct for nearly a century. View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Fukushima is surrendering to nature six years after nuclear meltdown

Nature has come for Fukushima. Six years after a nuclear meltdown resulted in a mass exodus of neighboring residents, the Fukushima prefecture is slowly being engulfed by a sea of green. View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Tardigrades will be the last surviving creatures on earth after the sun dies

In the event that Earth is struck by an asteroid, the sun goes supernova or the planet is struck by gamma ray bursts (an extreme energetic explosion), the last surviving creatures won’t be cockroaches, they will be tardigrades. Oxford University researchers recently discovered this after exposing the microscopic water bears to the only astrophysical phenomena likely to eradicate life on Earth. Not only did the team learn that the tardigrade can endure temperature extremes of up to 150°C (302°F),… View full post on Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingEco funeral – Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building