So You Want to Pass a Death with Dignity Law in Your State

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The number one constituent question we get at the National Center is, “what do I need to do to pass a Death with Dignity law in my state?” The answer is never easy because enacting a Death with Dignity law through the legislative process or ballot initiative is a complex, time-intensive, and expensive endeavor.

In a legislative environment, lawmakers are afraid of legislation focused on death even though repeated polls show a majority of Americans support Death with Dignity laws. Ballot initiatives are costly and time-consuming, requiring years of background work and the engagement of expensive professional political advisors nearly every step of the way.

The unfortunate reality is, while there’s a lot of activity and momentum in the New England region, not every state is ready to move forward immediately with Death with Dignity policy reform.

There are, however, lots of things you can do in your own state to jumpstart momentum and engage others in your request to push for reform, and I’m writing a five-part blog post about different ways to begin the process of legislative engagement in your state. Today’s post is focused on identifying allies because one thing is certain: you cannot do this alone.

Before you start, you need to understand your own commitment, including time and resource restraints. To effectively engage legislators, you may need to make a two to three year commitment of at least five hours a week. That’s a big investment of your time! Asking yourself whether you want to make that sort of commitment is important, because you’ll be asking others to join you. If you’re not willing, nor able, to make a commitment of that magnitude, there are other things you can do. Making the decision to go forward as a catalyst for statewide reform should be made with much deliberation and consultation with your family and friends.

If you really want to work on pushing Death with Dignity policy reform into the public debate, you’ll need a group of allies who share your passion. Realistically, you’ll need five or six people willing to invest approximately ten hours a month in volunteer time with the issue. To find such dedicated people—those who will become your “inner circle” of confidantes—you may need to approach 25-30 (or even more) potential volunteers.

This process may seem daunting, but you’ll repeat it over and over again throughout the time you’re engaged with the issue. In politics, when you don’t have big money, you have to have people…and our movement is all about people. It’ll get easier the more you do it. And, there are two wonderful things you’ll uncover: there’s more support in your community for Death with Dignity than you realize and people have the most amazing (and sometimes, tragic) stories to share.

For the most part, you’ll want to have individual meetings with potential volunteers. In these earliest of days, public meetings are not your friend. Ask five friends to tea; ask another five to join you for happy hour. Talk to five people at your church or synagogue, on your bowling league, or at your fitness club. Listen to their stories, and see what happens. You’ll find an ally willing to do this work with you, and then another.

Drop me an email and let me know your progress, and enjoy the stories.

Next up: Engaging Allies and Learning the Issue

View full post on Death with Dignity National Center



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